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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

 

FAQs

What exactly is "problem gambling"?
How extensive is problem gambling and what are the consequences?
What is the Safe Gaming System (SGS)?
How will the Safe Gaming System help?
Is the Safe Gaming System anti-gambling or anti-gaming?
What is SGS' relationship with gaming companies?
Why should a gaming industry company become involved in preventing gambling problems?
Is someone who gambles a lot sure to have issues/problems?


Q. What exactly is "problem gambling"?
A. "Problem Gambling" is the term used to describe gambling behavior, which causes disruption in any important life function, whether psychological, physical, social or vocational. This term is generally accepted to include, but is not limited to "Pathological", a.k.a., "Compulsive" gambling. Compulsive Gambling is a progressive addiction characterized by increasing preoccupation with gambling, a need to bet more money more frequently, restlessness or irritability when attempting to stop gambling, "chasing" losses, and loss of control by continuing negative gambling behavior, regardless of the disruption and serious consequences of such behavior.

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Q. How extensive is problem gambling and what are the consequences?
A. A research study was done by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago, in collaboration with three other research groups, on behalf of the National Gambling Impact Study Commission. The research group reported that:

" Based upon criteria developed by the American Psychiatric Association, we estimate that about 2.5 million adults are pathological gamblers and another 3 million adults should be considered problem gamblers. Extending these criteria more broadly, 15 million (American) adults are at risk for problem gambling, and about 148 million are low-risk gamblers (about 129 million adults have never gambled)."

"…Pathological and problem gamblers are more likely than other gamblers or non-gamblers to have been on welfare, declared bankruptcy, and to have been arrested or incarcerated."

"…Pathological and problem gamblers in the United States cost society approximately $5 billion per year and an additional $40 billion in lifetime costs for productivity reductions, social services, and creditor losses. However, these calculations are inadequate to capture the intra-familial costs of divorce and family disruption associated with problem and pathological gambling."

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Q. What is the Safe Gaming System?
A. The Safe Gaming System (SGS) is designed to safeguard its customers from developing gambling issues. It does so by providing a means that all customers who choose to gamble "pre-commit" to reasonable limits to gaming entertainment. An agreement between SGS and its customers ensures that time spent gambling and monetary losses a help to a level that is affordable for the individual customer. The use of SGS manages compliance with the agreed gaming budget.
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Q. How will the Safe Gaming System help?
A. When the Safe Gaming System is deployed and used as designed, its users learn how to gamble without excessive or in a harmful way. It will also raise awareness of the issues associated with problem gambling, which will lead to better prevention and practices.

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Q. Is the SGS anti-gambling or anti-gaming?
A. No. The SGS serves customers who choose to gamble. It is designed to help prevent them from become afflicted with gambling problems themselves, or causing social and economic problems for others, due to gambling abuses. It assists in educating and raising awareness of these issues, and to abate them through integrating management into active gambling.

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Q. What is the SGS' relationship with gaming companies?
A. The participation of the gaming industry, as a partner in eliminating/preventing gambling issues, is crucial to the success of the entire effort. We find that responsible gaming industry organizations do not desire to capitalize on negative behavior nor do they encourage unlawful or underage gambling. Gaming industry leaders realize that the industry as a whole must act in a socially responsible manner, like any other business that desires to be viable in the long run. SGS actively promotes interaction of gaming industry representatives with other stakeholders, including customers, government organizations, researchers, counselors, treatment centers, and the public-at-large.

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Q. Why should a gaming industry company become involved in preventing gambling problems?
A. Progressive gaming company representatives understand the need to integrate with the other stakeholders in support of a responsible approach toward their serving their customers. Active support of SGS clearly demonstrates a gaming company's concern for the overall welfare of their customers.

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Q. Is someone who gambles a lot sure to have issues/problems?
A. Not necessarily. Many people who gamble frequently are simply people who enjoy gambling as entertainment. Generally these people can manage their behavior and set aside a predetermined amount of money for gambling, gamble for fun rather than for the "certainty" of winning, recognize that they are likely to lose, and don't bet more than they can afford to lose. It's also possible to experience gambling issues without being a "problem" gambler -- someone can go out and lose a lot of money at a casino after being denied a promotion, for example. Often this sort of problem resolves itself without professional intervention.

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